Chapter: Rowan County

If you believe “what we do to the land, we do to the people,” then you’ll find friends in KFTC’s Rowan County chapter.

Members from Rowan and surrounding counties work together to address problems and have a say in policies and actions affecting the land and people here in our own communities and throughout the state. We raise awareness about mountaintop removal, air quality, water quality, tax fairness, clean and affordable energy, and other issues important to our members.

Our monthly chapter meeting is a great way to learn about our local and statewide work, share your own ideas and get involved.

 

Recent Activities

Rowan County members organize large turnout for Fairness ordinance hearing

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Members of the Rowan County Chapter of KFTC helped organize the record turn out for the first reading of the proposed Fairness Ordinance at the Morehead City Council meeting on Monday, November 11.  

Morehead State University President Dr. Wayne Andrews, who had been in contact with the Rowan chapter regarding the proposed ordinance, spoke eloquently for its need and thanked the council for its work in this matter.  Individual council members voiced their commitment to Fairness, and thanked members of the community for coordinating such an impressive show of support, before unanimously voting to approve the first reading. 

The ordinance will have its second reading at the council’s December meeting. If the second reading passes and the ordinance becomes law, Morehead will become the sixth city in Kentucky have a Fairness Ordinance on the books.

Public officials welcome to the conversation about a just transition in Appalachia

KFTC members welcomed Monday’s announcement by Governor Steve Beshear, U.S. Rep. Hal Rogers and others about a public process to gather and share ideas about ways to build a healthy, diverse economy in eastern Kentucky.

“I’m really excited,” said Letcher County KFTC member Elizabeth Sanders. “These elected leaders now appear to be whole-heartedly joining the conversation that is already alive in this region. That’s a welcome step that we haven’t seen in recent years. I’m glad they are calling for genuine involvement and collaboration with people living in southeastern Kentucky, and anyone with an interest in moving this part of the state forward.”
 


Collecting Wild Edibles and Medicinals workshop held in Floyd County

100_0400As a follow-up to the 2013 Growing Appalachia conference, members of the Big Sandy chapter and the Rowan County chapter organized a Collecting Wild Edibles and Medicinals workshop on September 8th in Floyd County.

Led by Rowan County chapter member Cody Montgomery, attendees hiked the hills around Wilson Creek and learned about the species located in our area, how to locate their habitats, specific uses for herbs, and how to prepare certain plans for personal use.

Morehead closer to a fairness ordinance

In January of this year, the Rowan County KFTC Chapter voted to begin working with the Kentucky Fairness Coalition on a fairness ordinance for the city of Morehead.

After educating themselves on the issue, chapter members met with members of the city council to express their support for fairness and provide useful information from the Kentucky Coalition.  At the end of August and beginning of September, the chapter helped organize the impressive turn out for the September 6 city council meeting, where chapter members Annie Adams and Cody Montgomery and Maria Horn, a student representative from Morehead State University’s Gay Straight Alliance, spoke in favor of the legislation.

Great resources and videos from Appalachia's Bright Future conference now online

The Appalachia’s Bright Future conference, held in Harlan, KY April 19-22, brought together more than 200 people for conversations about shaping a just transition in eastern Kentucky and Central Appalachia.

Appalachia's Bright Future

KFTC is pleased to now make available a large number of videos, presentations, notes, media coverage about the event, suggested next steps, and other documents that were shared or created during the weekend.

The collected information can be found here.

We appreciate all of the speakers, workshop presenters, artists and conference participants who shared stories and provided important information and perspectives. Even a brief review of the conference web pages makes it clear that this was a pretty extraordinary gathering and conversation.

As KFTC chairperson Sue Tallichet said during her opening remarks, “…it is difficult to envision more than a coal-based economy in our region. But I believe we have the opportunity, today, to build a diverse and healthy economy here in the mountains. Eastern Kentucky has many assets. We have a rich culture, an abundance of natural resources, and innovative, serious-minded, hard working people. Those things give us a foundation on which we can build.”

Justin Maxson, president of the Mountain Association for Community Economic Development, underscored the point. “…if you take anything away from what I say here today, I hope it is this: We know a lot more than we think we know. We have many more assets to build from than we often believe. And despite our many challenges, including rapid changes to our local and regional economy, there are innovative people providing hopeful examples all around us. What we need now is to knit these pieces together with a vision for Appalachian renewal and help grow them to scale.”

KFTC members and many of our allies in the region are spending time this month reflecting on the conference and developing key next steps. We encourage all KFTC members to bring your ideas and questions to the next chapter meeting in your area. You may also leave comments and questions on the conference web pages. And conference participants are invited to join a phone call on May 30th to discuss ways forward.

Together we can build Appalachia’s Bright Future.

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Regular Meetings:

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St. Alban's Episcopal Church
145 E. 5th St
Morehead, KY 40351
Monthly chapter meeting:

Third Thursday of the month, 6:00 p.m.

Upcoming Events:

May 28

Kentucky Poor People's Campaign: Non-violent Moral Fusion Direct Action

700 Capitol Avenue
Frankfort, KY 40601

June 4

Kentucky Poor People's Campaign: Non-violent Moral Fusion Direct Action

700 Capitol Avenue
Frankfort, KY 40601

June 11

Kentucky Poor People's Campaign: Non-violent Moral Fusion Direct Action

700 Capitol Avenue
Frankfort, KY 40601