Georgetown City Council | Kentuckians For The Commonwealth

Georgetown City Council

There are 16 candidates vying for a seat on the Georgetown City Council. The top eight vote getters in the nonpartisan race win two-year terms. Voters may vote for up to eight of the candidates. Thanks to the candidates who responded to KFTC’s survey.

Sonja Brent

Political party: Nonpartisan

Campaign Facebook: Facebook

Question 1:

What is the role of the Georgetown City Council in opposing white supremacy, addressing racial inequality and supporting racial justice for Black people, Indigenous people, Latinx people, immigrants, those who are undocumented, and all people of color in our city? Please identify at least two policy initiatives you would propose while in office to address racial and systemic inequalities.

I feel that the roles of city council while addressing these issues are to acknowledge that it is and still will be these issues in existence. In my opinion no matter what city council, the community or we as the people in our everyday lives do, there will be hatred from something or someone and the main thing to deal with this is to pray as this is the only way to get through it. If elected I would proposed that the council take time and get personal with the person or persons being affected and then take action to get this resolved. Even if the situation stays the same at least we as elected officials can show empathy for our constituents that has put us into office.

Tammy Lusby Mitchell

Political party: Nonpartisan

Question 1:

What is the role of the Georgetown City Council in opposing white supremacy, addressing racial inequality and supporting racial justice for Black people, Indigenous people, Latinx people, immigrants, those who are undocumented, and all people of color in our city? Please identify at least two policy initiatives you would propose while in office to address racial and systemic inequalities.

The city council's role is to represent EQUALLY all members of the community. Every voice. As a city councilwoman, I have marched in peaceful anti-racism marches in Georgetown. I attend community meetings on a regular basis within the black community. I take information gleaned from these meetings back to the city council or to city officials who can help resolve problems brought forward by members of these communities. I support recent policies put into place by our current administration to try to improve relationships in these areas including partnering with the Immigrant Initiative organization and participation in a county wide task force to address the growing homelessness problem.

Willow Hambrick

Political party: Nonpartisan

Campaign Facebook: Facebook

Question 1:

What is the role of the Georgetown City Council in opposing white supremacy, addressing racial inequality and supporting racial justice for Black people, Indigenous people, Latinx people, immigrants, those who are undocumented, and all people of color in our city? Please identify at least two policy initiatives you would propose while in office to address racial and systemic inequalities.

The Council must prioritize keeping ALL people safe, productive, and supported regardless of race or immigrant status. Racial inequality is systemic and must be acknowledged, resisted, and deconstructed. City Council should form a racial justice subcommittee to meet regularly with the "Community Coalition for Racial Justice", "Common Unity in the Community" and "KTFC" to find ways to increase equality in policy-making, law enforcement, lending practices, hiring, public works, and job creation. "Those who are closest to the problems are closest to the solutions" so listening and learning from POC is a must. Racial repair begins through relationship building, but anti-racist implementation must follow. We should pass an ordinance stating that there must be one minority representative on the City Council. We need Free Wi-Fi hot spots where immigrants, Latinx, and those who are home insecure can find information. The city website should be bi-lingual, and bi-lingual signage needs to direct people to G-Tran, the Free Medical Clinic, Amen House, Transform Scott County, and the Gathering Place. Hiring practices must be equitable, and law enforcement needs racial bias and de-escalation training. Minority city contracts and businesses should be supported. We also need to incentivize the Chamber of Commerce to support racial justice initiatives.