Members speak out to protect climate, clean energy jobs

In the final week of November, KFTC members Russell Oliver, Stanley Sturgill, Henry Jackson, Teri Blanton, Roger Ohlman, Mary Dan Easley and Mary Love converged in Charleston, West Virginia – alongside hundreds of other concerned people – to testify to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) against the agency’s proposed repeal of the Clean Power Plan.

“Now that we have cleaner, safer and cheaper ways to generate energy, the only question should be: how can we create more of those new jobs right here and right now in Appalachia? I know this because not only have I lived it, I’m still trying my best to keep living it,” said Stanley Sturgill of Harlan County, a retired coal miner and KFTC member.

KFTC members travel to D.C. to lobby for the RECLAIM Act


Hattie, Larry, Sarah, and Judge Executive Jim Ward meet with Megan Bell and Jake Johnson of Congressman Hal Rogers' Staff


This October, KFTC members Sarah Bowling, Larry Miller and Hattie Miller spent time in Washington, D.C. lobbying their congresspeople to pass the 2017 RECLAIM Act.

Larry is a retired coal miner from western Kentucky. “I worked underground for 23 years and very proud of that work,” he said.

“I believe, however, that coal will never again be Kentucky's primary economic engine. I am concerned that investments in mining operations here will eventually end. I take no pleasure in saying that, because I made a good living in coal for a long time, but it just looks like a reality to me.

Call Senators McConnell & Paul today to stop the latest ACA repeal bill in its tracks

From Kentucky Voices for Health

While some Senators are engaging in positive, bipartisan talks to stabilize the ACA marketplaces, proponents of Graham-Cassidy are trying to force a vote on repeal before the end of September (when current budget rules expire that allow the Senate to pass a repeal bill with just 50 votes, plus a tie-breaking vote from the Vice President).

The Graham-Cassidy bill is just as bad as all of the previous repeal efforts, if not worse.

Don’t hide from science. People near mines are dying; we need to know why

People in Appalachian Kentucky are dying at rates significantly higher than national averages.

We need to better understand why, through scientific research, to begin curing the health crises in the region. 

A Day in the Belly of the Beast

President Trump has stopped a federal study looking at the relationship between strip mining and human health. Despite that, a planned hearing took place in Hazard on August 21 and in Lexington on August 22. Jeff Chapman-Crane read the following that he and Sharman, his wife, had written together.


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