Economic Justice News

Panel encourages courageous solutions to economic issues

March 8, 2017 at 01:31pm
Jefferson County

University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law featured Dr. Jessica Gordon Nembhard, Professor Ariana R. Levinson and Sadiqa Reynolds for a lunch time panel discussion about cooperatives. Dr. Gordon Nembhard is an expert on the history of black-owned cooperatives. Her book, Collective Courage, is a groundbreaking study of the history of African American owned cooperatives. Prof. Levinson is an internationally recognized labor and employment law scholar with a background as a labor lawyer. She has recently published articles on worker and union cooperatives. Sadiqa Reynolds is the first female CEO of the Louisville Urban League. She was previously the Chief for Community Building for Louisville Mayor Greg Fisher. The discussion, with nods to the history of cooperatives, hinged on the possibilities for building a better economy with cooperatives. 

Chambers of commerce support bill altering Kentucky wage and hour laws; labor attorneys call it an attack on workers’ rights

February 24, 2017
Insider Louisville

"Mind-blowing" Senate Bill 237 is designed to allow employers to withhold wages without the written consent of employees, and limit the ability of some workers to receive overtime pay, rest and lunch periods, and a minimum wage – in addition to lowering the potential amount of damages an employer could be fined for violat

Leaked report suggests millions could lose coverage under GOP health proposal

February 25, 2017
Vox

Republican replacement plans for Obamacare would lead to significant declines in the number of Americans with health insurance coverage, according to an analysis presented Saturday at

Reflections from a Grassroots Leader

February 21, 2017 at 11:29am
Jefferson County

Jefferson County KFTC member Cassia Herron represented the organization at The Rally to Move Forward in Louisville on January 21, 2017 – one of several local marches that took place across the state in solidarity with the Women’s March in Washington, D.C. KFTC organizer Alicia Hurle sat down with Cassia to learn more about her thoughts on leadership development within KFTC and how she approached having the opportunity to speak to such a large audience at what feels like a historically significant moment. Click here to listen to Cassia's speech. 


Why do you identify yourself as a community organizer?

From a grade school student who rallied my peers to challenge our prejudice teacher to a student at the University of Louisville who worked on improving the conditions on campus for students of color, I have always been a community organizer. It has been a natural position for me as my peers and colleagues have looked to me to represent a particular position or idea, to rally others in support of it and move us collectively toward action to remedy it. I have had the opportunity to receive professional organizing training from union organizers and Highlander Center trainers as well as working with Community Farm Alliance and now KFTC. Of course I’m biased, but I feel these are the best organizers in the south and certainly in Kentucky, and I’m proud to be a product of their great work.

Obamacare repeal may threaten drug treatment access

February 15, 2017
The Courier-Journal

Repealing the Affordable Care Act would result in more than 61,400 Kentuckians with mental illness or substance use disorder losing coverage.

ACA repeal will kill people

January 13, 2017
The Courier-Journal

People need to understand that not having insurance kills people.

ACA repeal would be devastating in Ky.

January 31, 2017
The Courier-Journal

Communities thrive when they have a strong foundation made up of things like good schools and quality healthcare.

We Stood For Kentucky

February 13, 2017 at 05:24pm

Showing that we are solid as a rock, rooted like a tree and standing strong, hundreds of KFTC members and friends took to the halls of the state capitol on Tuesday to Stand For Kentucky.

Lawmakers must focus on ways to increase workers’ wages

January 13, 2017
Lexington Herald-Leader

Research from the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy shows wages are roughly $1,500 lower in right-to-work states, and promises of job growth from the policy are particularly hollow. A repeal of the prevailing wage needs no research to show it will lower wages and often encourages out-of-state companies to take bids away from Kentucky workers.

Mapping environmental (in)justice in Kentucky

December 8, 2016 at 01:13pm

As KFTC members work to design a new, clean energy system for our state, we want principles of environmental justice and health equity to be at the front and center of our process and plan. Developing an Environmental Justice analysis is one important step we are taking to better understand which communities in our state are most affected by pollution, poor health, economic inequality and racial injustice.