Racial Justice

KFTC is working for a day when discrimination is wiped out of our laws, habits, and hearts.

Scott County members participate in 16th Annual MLK March!

Marchers at the 16th Annual MLK March in Georgetown!

For the 16th straight year, the Georgetown-Scott County NAACP Unit celebrated Martin Luther King, Jr. Day with a march and program commemorating the legacy and message of the late civil rights leader. In the current environment that we are in, with growing income inequality, elected leaders playing to racial and religious differences, and a struggle to define what it means to be American, it was an important day to stand together.

Conversations to build racial understanding in Berea

One of the most persistent issues in the United States is learning how to support diverse communities. Our history has created a dynamic whereby our towns are enriched by many cultures and backgrounds, but our society is still reckoning with systemic and entrenched racism.

In November 2017, the Madison County KFTC Chapter’s Racial Justice Committee met and decided to expand its structure to include a community-building focus to its approach in addition to its more action-focused work. This work was spearheaded by members Wendy Warren (steering committee representative) and Shannon Roberts Smith.

The goal of the community-building focus of the Racial Justice Committee is to provide space for committee members and allies to form relationships outside of planning and implementing campaigns and/or actions. Also, they hope to broaden reach and encourage conversations that can be difficult for many members of the community who are new to racial justice work.

Carol Taylor-Shim leads KFTC staff in anti-oppression training

On Thursday, November 30, Carol Taylor-Shim led an Anti-Oppression training for KFTC’s staff team. Carol is currently the director of the Bias Incident Response team at the University of Kentucky, and has over a decade of experience in diversity, inclusion, and belonging and anti-racist/anti-oppression practice. She’s also a self-described “Liberation Superhero” (after this training, I would describe her that way, too). The training addressed the questions: 

  • What’s the difference between diversity, inclusion, and belonging?
  • How does oppression impact people and environments?
  • Why are people resistant?
  • What are potential next steps for KFTC?

Northern Kentucky chapter joins Immigrant Dignity Coalition

Following the recent ICE raids across northern Kentucky, and the resulting work the chapter has engaged in to protect immigrant families in northern Kentucky, the Northern Kentucky KFTC Chapter was asked to become members of the Immigrant Dignity Coalition. This coalition, made up of 28 groups/organizations in northern Kentucky and Greater Cincinnati, consists of business, labor, civil rights and faith communities in the greater Cincinnati area that favor the dignity and basic human rights of all people. We are citizens and immigrants working together to share educational and advocacy tools to create a more just world.

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