Racial Justice

KFTC is working for a day when discrimination is wiped out of our laws, habits, and hearts.

First Thursday Club - Madison County Chapter

Join the Madison County chapter of KFTC on 

Get Out Film Screening

Join Northern Kentucky members and others in the community for a screening of Get Out, the acclaimed psychological thriller that deals with race in America.
Following the showing of the film there will be a discussion about what the audience took away from the film, and about how close (or far) away from acheiving racial justice America is in 2018. 

Get Out Film Screening

The Scott County chapter co-hosted a showing of the film Get Out with allies in Georgetown as a continuation of a racial justice film series.

Northern Kentucky chapter unpacks politics

Michelle Slaughter, Jason Reser, Arnold Simpson, Pam Mullins, Ken Rechtin, and Sister Janet

Northern Kentucky members have expressed an interest in trying to help understand how local government works since the resistance training in January. Out of that training they hosted an Unpack Politics forum to help people better understand how different levels of government work. Be it city, county, school board, or state government, many people are unsure as to what government is responsible for what.

NKY Supporting Our Neighbors Immigrant Rights Workshop

Heyra and Jose lead discussion on next steps attendees can take to protect and promote immigrant rights.

Heyra Avila, an animated young woman from Florence, addressed a group of us fellow northern Kentuckians on a Wednesday night at the end of long day. Her energy was infectious. Her story made a deep impression. She opened up about a precarious, hard-to-imagine trek that she and her family made over a decade ago between Mexico and the U.S.

Her parents, wanting to give their children a more solid future, had chosen to leave their small, metal sheet roofed home not too far from the U.S. border and try their luck over here. Heyra described herself as “lucky.” The dangerous journey they made across the dessert when she was four was safer than it was for most pursuing the same route. Her family had the good fortune of finding a car, providing them with overnight shelter and preventing them from complete exposure to the desert elements or predators—likely both animal and human.

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